Lesson Two: Forces & Motion

Have you heard of the Law of Gravity? Well, the same guy who discovered that law, Sir Isaac Newton, also discovered a related law, The Law of Motion, over 300 years ago.  Watch this lesson to learn more about Newton's Law of Motion!

 

Dec 26, 2020

 

FORCES AND MOTION:

Objectives: Understanding forces and motion 

  • Discover the effects of different pushes and pulls on an object
  • Investigate balanced and unbalanced forces on the motion of an object

Methodology: The recommended program includes:

  • Evergreen Aviation & Space Museum’s Fly-By, Forces and Motion
  • Hands-on demonstration

Learning Questions: How do pushes and pulls affect the motion of an object? How do the forces that act on an airplane make it fly?

Next Generation Science Standards:

  • K-PS2-1: Plan and conduct an investigation to compare the effects of different strengths or different directions of pushes and pulls on the motion of an object.
  • 3-PS2-1: Plan and conduct an investigation to provide evidence of the effects of balanced and unbalanced forces on the motion of an object.

Background:

The motions of an object can be described using the Laws of Motion, discovered by Sir Isaac Newton over 300 years ago. These laws help us understand that the motion of an object is directly tied to the forces acting on it. For example, objects will stay at rest or at a constant motion unless another force acts on it. Forces act on every object, and the changing forces on an object change how it moves.

Materials:

  • One piece of paper

Time: 30 minutes

Activity:

Wad up your piece of paper into a ball. Hold your arm out in front of you and drop the ball of paper. Try again, but this time, start with your hand next to your shoulder and push your arm forward as you release the wad. Try it one last time, but this time, put your hand behind you like you’re pitching a baseball and throw the wad.

  • Where does the wad of paper fall each time?
  • What forces are acting on the wad of paper?
  • What force is changing each time? How is it changing?
  • What would you happen if you launched the wad of paper from a catapult instead?

Questions to Answer in this week’s Fly-By:

  • What forces are acting on you when you are sitting in your chair?
  • How do forces change when you jump into the air?
  • What forces are acting on the planet, Earth?

 

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